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Top 10 tips for email signups

It’s no secret that experts and surveys put email marketing as a ‘must’ for digital marketers looking for effectiveness and return on investment (ROI). 41% of marketers polled rated email as their best performing channel, along with 47% who said that email delivered the most ROI, ahead of social at 19%

 But, how of you get website visitors to subscribe to emails and improve sign up rates over 2%? A survey by global digital analysts Econsultancy provides useful tips and tricks.

 Targeting. Don’t treat all site visitors the same, they aren’t. Detecting them as individuals and personalising the experience will convert more site visitors to sign ups.

 Placement. Think about where the signup will sit on a page. The norm is to run in the footer of each webpage, but this might not be as effective as placing the call to action above the fold. Dynamic methods are more common in the US and also ensure visibility, viewed as a popup or overlay, but can have a negative impact on the user experience.

 Visibility. There are two aspects to making your call to action more noticeable, the look (size, shape, text size, colour and boldness) and the prominence.

 Anything that requires an action, moves or gets into a persons face is likely to get their attention, but this could be for good or bad… Research by Privy found that a banner that starts ‘hidden’ and rolls out on activation had the best conversion rates (2.2%) over email bar (1.34%) and popup (1.31%).

 Timing. Audience targeting and the time the user has spent on a site are the two main types of timing important to email call to actions. The checkout is a retailers’ favourite time to capture sign ups, while a display of a cal to action cold be triggered by time, scrolling or a mouse movement. Further research by Privy found that visitors were 25 times more likely to subscribe when they triggered the signup form themselves by clicking a tab, than if it was automatically triggered by time, scrolling or exit.

 Proposition. You’re more likely to get signups if the individual is persuaded in doing so because there’s a special offer, or something in it for them. Conversion rate by campaign content type found that entering into a prize draw had a conversion of 15%, as opposed to standard sign up 1%.

 Copy. Sell your email like it’s a product! Convince the individual that by signing up they’re going to be rewarded.

 Ease. Keep signups simple! The longer the form, the less likely the signup. Only ask for information you actually need, such as first name and email address. Privy research found that every field added reduces the sign ups by 25%

 Legitimacy. There are three basic elements that must be followed; sending emails to people who did not sign up is bad for brand reputation and can incur legal repercussions, the customer should always feel in control of the relationship and a successful email list is quality of subscribers.

 Clarity. Setting clear expectations of the kind of frequency of emails new subscribers will receive will help reduce opt-outs in the near future.

 Testing. Test different models, by doing so you’ll have a clear understanding of what works and which work better, such as placements, copy, campaigns, etc. A/B testing of alternative webpages can determine effectiveness of various methods. Measure and track results using web analytics and behavioural tools such as heatmaps.

www.econsultancy.com

SNP-Social

SNP won the marketing election

Email service provider Mailjet has analysed the recent general election campaign and found that if results were based on direct marketing performance alone, the Scottish National Party (SNP) would walk away with a clear victory, ahead of Labour in second place and the Conservatives in third place.

Communications sent out by the major political parties were analysed over a four-week period by marketing experts at Mailjet, who then scored emails on seven separate performance indicators including design, personalisation, cross-channel marketing, automation and creativity of content.

With a total of 29 points up for grabs, the research shows all parties are failing to make use of email communications as effectively as they could to reach voters. In fact, the Conservative Party only sent two emails throughout the four week test period, achieving just 10.5 points, compared to the other parties sending seven on average.

Analysis showed that camping leaders failed to make use of personalisation techniques, with the only details required to sign-up for each party’s emails being name, email address and postcode.

All parties bar Conservatives address emails by individual name, with the Conservatives sending emails as a collective group.

Josie Scotchmer, UK marketing manager at Mailjet, commented:  “The generic mass messages being shared by parties in this snap election show no evidence of audience segmentation to increase the relevance of emails to their recipients. The only use of personalisation was using the first name to address readers; parties fail to take advantage of huge opportunities to resonate with voters based on their location and demographic data.”

When it comes to subject lines the Green Party took the lead, with 2.67 points out of 5, with Labour just ahead of the Conservative party with 2.55 points against the Tories’ 2.5 points.

The experts look at the optimum length, word inclusion, whether subject lines are personal and include a call to action, and whether they’re creative. For example, the Green Party shared an email titled ‘OK I admit it. I’m lonely’ where Caroline Lucas calls on the party’s supporters to elect another MP alongside her.

The Labour party’s email subject lines also include snappy statements such as ‘Dodged questions’, ‘Last chance’ and ‘We will be outspent’ to drive open rates and action from the recipient.

In contrast, the SNP won the majority of their points on core content and call to action, scoring 3.0 out of 5 and 3.27 out of 5 respectively. The party’s emails include video content as well as strong calls to action, asking its subscriber base to volunteer and donate highlighted with the design of buttons. Labour also scored well here, sharing their manifesto amidst the news it had been leaked, and offering branded Labour campaign bags for the supporters quickest to donate.

Two other areas of email marketing the political parties are not utilising at the moment are automation and cross-channel marketing inclusion. For example, social media buttons, redirecting to app or website content were only used by the Scottish National Party and Green Party. The Green Party are also the only candidates showing signs of using automation techniques, but even this was minimal.

Scotchmer concluded: “In failing to adopt automation throughout their election campaigns, these political parties have missed a huge trick. Automation can greatly affect relationships with supporters as they now expect engagement from organisations that is tailored to their interests and delivered in real-time. In addition, it’s not expensive to deliver campaigns in this way; the market for this technology is now competitive and it’s increasingly possible to invest in automation at every level.”

www.mailjet.com

Email marketing top of the ROI Charts

The 2017 Econsultancy/Adestra email Marketing Industry Census has revealed that email marketing is top of the ROI Charts for the third year in a row.

Based on a survey of over 1,200 marketers undertaken between February and March 2017, 73% of companies along with 76% of agency respondents rated it excellent or good.

Budget allocated, however, was only 15% of total marketing budget, with a feeling that the growing complexity of the digital marketing landscape still left many marketers confused as to how best allocate funds to create a more complete campaign.

Those marketers who are more tech savvy and able to master the data and successes within email marketing are set to gain business advantages over competitors over the next 12 month period.

“The results of this year’s Census show that marketers are struggling to see the bigger picture and stand by their choices,” explained Henry Hyder-Smith, Adestra CEO. “By getting the fundamentals working together – personalisation, automation, integration, optimisation – they can make the most of the technology available, offer their customers the experience they are looking for, and realise the benefits of becoming First-Person Marketers.”

Monica Savut, head of research services at Econsultancy, said: “Email continues to be one of the most effective marketing channels and it’s encouraging to see that marketers are looking beyond standalone campaigns by embracing marketing automation and personalisation. However, this year’s Census shows that marketers need to adopt a more rigorous approach, keeping a sharp focus on both technology and strategy while never losing sight of the customer.

“The rewards are there for the taking, but reaping maximum value is dependent on two key success factors: investment that is proportional to any potential returns and a comprehensive strategy that focuses on continuous measurement, testing and optimisation.”

The full report can be downloaded here:

2017 Email Marketing Industry Census